Reviews Mad Max: Fury Road George Miller’s “Mad Max” films

Reviews Mad Max: Fury Road George Miller’s “Mad Max” films

Best 2010s car chase movies: From John Wick to Mad Max | British GQ

George Miller’s “Mad Max” films didn’t just make Mel Gibson a star—they completely
transformed post-apocalyptic entertainment with their visceral stunt work and singular vision of an increasingly desperate future.
Three decades after the last film, the oft-maligned “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome,”
Miller finally returns to this desolate landscape for the highly-anticipated “Mad Max: Fury Road,”
recasting the title role in the grizzled visage of Tom Hardy and upping the stakes
with promises of vehicular mayhem on a level commensurate with what modern CGI audiences have come to expect.
From its very first scenes, “Fury Road” vibrates with the energy of a veteran filmmaker working at the top of his game,
pushing us forward without the cheap special effects or paper-thin characters that have so often defined the modern summer blockbuster.
Miller hasn’t just returned with a new installment in a money-making franchise.
The man who re-wrote the rules of the post-apocalyptic action genre has returned to show a generation
of filmmakers how they’ve been stumbling in their attempts to follow in his footsteps.

“Who was more crazy? Me, or everyone else?” In “Mad Max: Fury Road,”

Miller has pushed his Gilliam-esque vision of a world gone mad to its logical extreme.

No longer are the people of Max Rockatansky’s world merely scavengers for oil or power;

they have been transformed into creatures of circumstance, either left with one defining need or left without any semblance of reason.

“Fury Road” is a violent film, but the violent acts in this world don’t feel like arbitrary action

beats—they emerge from a complete lack of other options or a firm sense of straight-up insanity. อ่านต่อ

 

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